2007 Jaguar S-Type

By July 29, 2007
2007 Jaguar S-Type

A cat flows like dark liquid in moonlight, and so do the lines of a Jaguar S-Type. You can buy other mid-size luxury sedans with similar performance, but you won't find another that looks anything like this. And that, really, is the point of any Jaguar. If you are charmed by its looks, then there is no alternative.

But even from a more objective point of view, we like the Jaguar S-Type. It's a comfortable car, it handles well, and it makes a statement when it pulls up to a five-star hotel.

The base 3.0-liter V6 delivers responsive performance, thanks partly to the superb six-speed automatic transmission. Opt for the 4.2 model and you get thrilling performance from its powerful V8 engine. If that isn't enough, you can spring for the high-performance S-Type R, which boasts a supercharged engine, adaptive sports suspension, and bigger front brakes.

The S-Type sedan is certainly a better car now than when it was launched in 1999. Even then we praised its beautiful exterior and rich interior, and enthused over its sporty handling. Jaguar re-engineered the S-Type for 2003 and revamped its styling for 2005 when the wonderful ZF six-speed automatic transmission became standard across the range. Additional refinements arrived with the 2006 models. The premium-level 4.2-liter V8 was re-tuned just slight to deliver even 300 horsepower in its naturally aspirated form and 400 horsepower with a supercharger. At the same time, both the base 3.0-liter V6 and the normally aspirated V8 achieved ULEV emissions status. A new Conti-Teves braking system promised more stopping power.

For 2007, Jaguar has focused on interior refinement. All S-Types now come with the same grade of leather, the premium grade. And there is no more Premium Package for the base model because all of the features it added are now standard.

Another more gradual but no less significant change: Jaguar's quality has been dramatically improved over the past few years and recent buyers report being very happy with their new S-Types.

Model Lineup

The 2007 Jaguar S-Type includes three models, distinguished primarily by their engines. Each comes with rich leather upholstery and all the other features associated with a premium luxury car. All models come with a six-speed automatic transmission.

The S-Type 3.0 ($48,335) is powered by a 235-hp 3.0-liter V6. Standard equipment includes premium leather upholstery with contrasting piping on the seats; automatic dual-zone climate control; burl walnut interior trim; heated front seats with multiple power adjustments for the driver and passenger; power adjustable wood-and-leather steering wheel; power-adjustable pedals; memory system for seat, pedals, outside mirrors and steering column; split folding rear seat; 140-watt AM/FM/CD stereo; one-touch tilt-and-slide power glass sunroof; power windows; remote central locking; electrochromic mirrors inside and out; rain-sensing windshield wipers; Reverse Park Control; programmable garage-door opener; and 17-inch alloy wheels. The 3.0-liter models can be upgraded with a Navigation/Bluetooth Package ($2,800), auto-leveling xenon headlamps ($675), and Front Park Control ($250).

The S-Type 4.2 ($55,335) comes with a 300-hp 4.2-liter V8 plus a 320-watt Alpine premium stereo with six-CD changer; DVD-based satellite navigation; Bluetooth connectivity; xenon headlamps with automatic leveling; Front Park Control; additional seat adjustability; burl walnut gear selector knob; electric rear sunblind; and foot well rugs embroidered with the Jaguar logo.

The high-performance S-Type R ($63,335) gets a 400-hp supercharged version of the same 4.2-liter V8 and most (but not all) of the standard 4.2's amenities. Chassis upgrades include Jaguar's enhanced Computer Active Suspension (eCATS), bigger brake discs up front, and 18-inch alloy wheels. Inside are performance-style seats and gray-stained bird's-eye maple in place of walnut burl. The shift knob is leather-covered and there's no wood on the steering wheel. Stainless exhaust tips, a trunk lid spoiler, a body-color (instead of bright) molding around the grille, and a unique three-scoop motif below the front bumper. A Luxury Package ($3,000) adds Adaptive Cruise Control and reverts to a more traditional walnut-burl interior theme. It also includes an electric rear sunblind; premium foot well rugs; and bright exterior trim on bumper blades, grille surround, mirror caps, and side window frames. Adaptive Cruise Control is optional ($2,200) on the R.

Optional across the range is Sirius Satellite Radio ($450). Eighteen-inch wheels with Continental ProContact all-season tires ($800) are offered on 3.0 and 4.2; while R buyers can choose 19-inch wheels ($1,200). Special-order paint and trim ($1,000) are available for any S-Type.

Safety features on all S-Types include Dynamic Stability Control (DSC) with traction control; Emergency Brake Assist; frontal airbags, seat-mounted side-impact airbags, and side-curtain airbags; Jaguar's Adaptive Restraint Technology System which uses ultrasound (in addition to the usual sensors) to collect data on the size and position of front-seat occupants before deploying the airbags with appropriate force.

Walkaround

At a glance, the 2007 Jaguar S-Type looks much the same as it did when it was introduced in 1999, as an intentionally retro tribute to some of the best-loved Jaguars of the past: specifically the 1956 compact saloon that became the wider-tracked, bigger-windowed Mark II in 1960 and, ultimately, the longer-tailed, all-independent-suspension S-Type of 1963.

Ironically, or perhaps appropriately, the current S-Type has evolved almost as thoroughly in its nine years on the market. Jaguar substantially re-styled the S-Type for 2005, giving it a sharper, cleaner, more assertive face, with a more sharply defined V-shaped bulge in its hood.

At the same time, the S-type acquired a longer, leaner look down the side with better integrated door sills. Around back, its distinctive round tail lamps provided a more technical, jewel-like appearance and blended smoothly into the new curves of the tail. The wider rear trunk finisher was simplified, running the full width between the new rear lamps. Jaguar claims the subtly re-shaped trunk reduced both lift and drag.

The changes continued for 2006 when the chrome mesh grille previously seen only on the high-performance R-model became standard across the lineup.

The wipers feature an interesting washing system, with the washer jets incorporated into the wiper arms for better coverage. Lever-style door handles remain, which are aerodynamic but we find them harder to grab than the kind you slide your fingers through.

Body panels fit closely together. Quality has improved dramatically in recent years. In 1989, Jaguar ranked at the bottom of the list in the J.D. Power and Associates Initial Quality Study, one rung above Yugo. By 2003 Jaguar had risen to third from the top, just below Lexus and Cadillac. For 2007, Jaguar still scores in the top eight in an increasingly competitive race, where that rating represents a much higher standard of quality than it did a decade ago.

Interior Features

All Jaguar S-Types come with the same grade of rich leather upholstery. Sumptuous leather is used on the surfaces of all seats and door panels, with contrasting piping on most models. Burl walnut wood veneer is standard; gray-stained bird's-eye maple is used for the supercharged R-model, but the warmer natural walnut can be substituted as part of the new S-Type R Luxury Package.

The wood-and-leather steering wheel looks and feels good; and it harmonizes visually with the colors of the instrument panel behind it. A well-designed toggle on the left side of the steering column quickly, easily and precisely controls the power tilt and telescopic adjustments for the steering wheel.

The front seats are comfortable and supportive, with a nice firm seat bottom that minimizes fatigue on long trips.

There is a decent amount of space for rear-seat passengers. Rear legroom is on par with other similar sized cars.

The instrument pod contains just a fuel gauge and water temperature gauge besides the speedometer and tachometer. All told it is a pleasant design. Climate controls and sound system buttons are big, easy to discern and easy to operate.

Two glove boxes are provided in addition to the center console storage. Sunglasses can be stashed in an overhead console case lined with soft rubber. Dual cupholders are provided, but are mounted far enough to the rear as to be a bit awkward to reach while driving.

Trunk space is only average at 14.1 cubic feet, due to the curvy rear end. Old-fashioned swan-neck hinges intrude into the cargo space, but their advantage is that the trunk lid will conveniently pop up when opened. The rear seats can be folded down in a 60/40 split for 28.6 cubic feet of cargo space.

The electronically controlled parking brake is designed to work intuitively and will automatically release in certain circumstances: Switch on the parking brake with the car in Drive at an intersection and it switches off when you accelerate, handy when stopping for traffic lights on steep hills.

Driving Impressions

Driving the Jaguar S-Type is satisfying, and it imparts a feeling of class and sophistication to passengers.

The S-Type comes with a great transmission, perhaps the best available. The six-speed automatic ZF is the same transmission used in the BMW 7 Series. This transmission is extremely responsive and silky smooth. With more gears to choose from, it offers excellent drivability around town. It delivers both good performance and decent fuel economy. A Sport mode allows the driver to shift manually. Select this mode and the transmission will not shift above the highest gear selected, though as needed it will shift down and back up below this gear. The transmission has two overdrive ratios. Sport mode stays in fifth unless the driver maintains a steady speed for 30 seconds. But most of the time we preferred to simply leave it in Drive and let it do its thing, as it does it so well. It's a smart transmission: lift off the throttle for a corner, and it senses the steering angle and holds the lower gear. It also holds a gear on hills, eliminating hunting between gears.

The 3.0-liter V6 engine is smooth and delivers plenty of power for most drivers. We found it offers good power for passing. Floor it at 50 mph in fifth gear and in a heartbeat the six-speed automatic smoothly downshifts to second at 5500 rpm, surging without lurching. Jaguar says the S-Type 3.0 can accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 7.5 seconds. The V6 was smooth and civilized when cruising, and noise from the engine was isolated. Under hard acceleration, however, the sound it made reminded us that it is a Ford Duratec.

We found cornering to be exceptional in the S-Type 3.0. It felt a little squishy when driven hard on a winding road, but the car didn't lean a lot, and grip was very good. Add in the Dynamic Stability Control, and it's hard to get into trouble. The S-Type rides smoothly and is nicely damped, even if it is tuned more for handling than a soft ride. Driving through the Texas hill country outside Austin, the car jiggled a bit from side to side on bumpy rural roads, a little more than we would have liked. And you can hear the hiss of the tires. Completely isolating the driver from the road has never been a Jaguar design objective.

The 4.2-liter V8 engine delivers truly spirited performance with strong low-rpm torque for quicker acceleration. Jaguar says the S-Type 4.2 can accelerate form 0 to 60 mph in 6.2 seconds, which is quite quick. The 4.2 feels relaxed and responsive around town and cruising on the highway, but delivers spirited performance when driving quickly on back roads. The 4.2 V8 generates 86 percent of its maximum torque at just 1500 rpm for greater flexibility around town. This is a very strong car by any measure.

The 4.2 offers a firm ride without being too harsh. There is some road vibration on badly rippled roads, but it smoothes out on better surfaces. The 4.2 is quiet, with some wind noise at high speeds. It's stable at high speeds with precise, linear steering that makes the driver feel part of the car. The S-Type is not as stiff as the BMW 5 Series. It is the type of car that inspires confidence for those who enjoy driving without being a chore for those who do not. It felt wonderful when driving hard on narrow, winding roads. In short, it's a wonderful automobile, very pleasant.

The S-Type R offers fantastic acceleration performance. Jaguar says it can accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in just 5.3 seconds with a top speed electronically limited to 155 mph. We could clearly hear the whine from supercharger when hard on the gas. Hot rodders love it, but we wonder whether it would become tiresome. Superchargers deliver better low-end torque and more linear response than turbochargers and the R model offers significantly more torque than the normally aspirated 4.2. It's very responsive at low speeds as well as when being driven hard. Power is very linear. Handling is superb. Steering is precise and linear

Summary

With its sensuous looks, the 2007 Jaguar S-Type makes a statement when it rolls onto the scene. It combines that with a luxurious, crafted interior in understated British fashion. The S-Type cars are effortless to drive with a relaxed, refined ride. They offer cutting-edge technology that's relevant and free of gadgetry. The S-Type is a compelling alternative to the BMW 5 Series and Mercedes-Benz E-Class. The Jaguar is less expensive and more than holds its own in curb appeal, performance and features. We really like the basic 3.0 and love the 4.2 with its powerful V8.

NewCarTestDrive.com editor Mitch McCullough contributed to this report, reporting from Spain and Los Angeles.

Model Line Overview
Model lineup:Jaguar S-Type 3.0 ($48,335); S-Type 4.2 ($55,335); S-Type R ($63,335)
Engines:235-hp 3.0-liter dohc 24-valve V6; 300-hp 4.2-liter dohc 32-valve V8; 400-hp 4.2-liter dohc 32-valve supercharged V8
Transmissions:6-speed automatic
Safety equipment (standard):ABS, EBA, traction control, dynamic stability control (DSC), dual front airbags with ARTS controlled deployment, front side-impact airbags, front and rear side curtain airbags, active head restraints, front seatbelt pretensioners, rear child seat tethers and anchors, Reverse Park Control
Safety equipment (optional):Front Park Control, self-leveling xenon headlamps
Basic warranty:4 years/50,000 miles
Assembled in:Birmingham, England
Specifications As Tested
Model tested (MSPR):Jaguar S-Type 3.0 liter ($48,335)
Standard equipment:dual automatic climate control, leather-trimmed seats, burl walnut veneer trim, AM/FM/CD, power windows, power mirrors, power locks, cruise control, power tilt/telescopic steering, wood and leather steering wheel, aluminum alloy wheels, memory system, split fold-down rear seat, HomeLink garage door opener, one-touch power moonroof, power front seats seat with lumbar support
Options as tested (MSPR):none
Destination charge:$665
Gas guzzler tax:N/A
Price as tested (MSPR):$49000
Layout:rear-wheel drive
Engine:4.2-liter dohc 32v V8
Horsepower (lb.-ft @ rpm):235 @ 6800
Torque (lb.-ft @ rpm):216 @ 4100
Transmission:6-speed automatic
EPA fuel economy, city/hwy:19/28 mpg
Wheelbase:114.5 in.
Length/width/height:193.1/71.6/57.0 in.
Track, f/r:60.4/60.7 in.
Turning circle:37.7 ft.
Seating Capacity:5
Head/hip/leg room, f:38.6/NA/43.1 in.
Head/hip/leg room, m:N/A
Head/hip/leg room, r:36.4/NA/37.0 in.
Cargo volume:14.1 cu. ft.
Payload:N/A
Towing capacity:N/A
Suspension, f:independent, forged aluminum double wishbones, coil-over shocks, anti-roll bar
Suspension, r:independent, forged aluminum double wishbones, coil-over shocks, anti-roll bar
Ground clearance:4.1 in.
Curb weigth:3760 lbs.
Tires:235/50R17
Brakes, f/r:vented disc/vented disc with ABS, Brake Assist
Fuel capacity:18.4 gal.
Unless otherwise indicated, specifications refer to test vehicle. All prices are manufacturer's suggested retail prices (MSPR) effective as of July 29, 2007.Prices do not include manufacturer's destination and delivery charges. N/A: Information not available or not applicable. Manufacturer Info Sources: 1-800-4JAGUAR - www.jaguarcars.com

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